10. “Percy” (1971)

The Kinks -

Percy is a 1971 film soundtrack for the British comedy film Percy performed by English rock group the Kinks with additional orchestral arrangements conducted by Stanley Myers. The songs were written by Ray Davies and include both standard rock/pop songs and instrumental numbers.

9. The Kink Kronikles (1972) [Compilation]

The Kinks - The Kink Kronikles

The Kink Kronikles is a compilation double album by The Kinks, released on Reprise Records in 1972, after the band had signed with RCA Records in 1971. It comprises mostly singles with five tracks taken from albums released by the band from 1966 to 1971; two tracks were previously unreleased. Designed specifically for the American market, it peaked at #94 on the Billboard 200.

8. Kinda Kinks (1965)

The Kinks - Kinda Kinks

Kinda Kinks is the second studio album by English rock band The Kinks, released in 1965. Recorded and released within two weeks after returning from a tour in Asia, Ray Davies and the band were not satisfied with the production. The single “Tired of Waiting for You” was a #1 hit on the UK Singles Charts.

7. The Kink Kontroversy (1965)

The Kinks - The Kink Kontroversy

The Kink Kontroversy is the third studio album by English rock band The Kinks, released on 26 November 1965. It is a transitional work, with elements of both the earlier Kinks’ styles (heavily blues-influenced songs such as “Milk Cow Blues”, and variations on the band’s hits from 1964-65 such as “Till the End of the Day”) and early indications of the future direction of Ray Davies’ songwriting styles (“The World Keeps Going Round” and “I’m On an Island”).

6. Muswell Hillbillies (1971)

The Kinks - Muswell Hillbillies

Muswell Hillbillies is an album by the English rock group The Kinks. Released in November 1971, it was the band’s first album for RCA Records. The album is named after the Muswell Hill area of North London, where band leader Ray Davies and guitarist Dave Davies grew up and the band formed in the early 1960s.

The album centred on themes of poverty and working-class life, as well as the destruction and subdivision of old Victorian neighbourhoods—a practice that had become commonplace in North London during the 1970s.

5. Face to Face (1966)

The Kinks - Face to Face

Face to Face is the fourth studio album by the English rock band the Kinks, released in October 1966. The album had marked the band’s shift from the hard-driving style of beat music, catapulting them to international acclaim. Being their first album consisting entirely of Ray Davies’ compositions, it has also been regarded by critics as rock’s first concept album.

4. Something Else by The Kinks (1967)

The Kinks - Something Else by The Kinks

Something Else by The Kinks, often referred to as just Something Else, is the fifth UK studio album by The Kinks, released in September 1967. It marks the final involvement of American producer Shel Talmy in the Kinks’ 1960s studio recordings; henceforth Ray Davies would produce recordings. Many of the recordings feature the keyboard work of Nicky Hopkins and the backing vocals of Ray’s wife, Rasa. Two hit singles are included: “Waterloo Sunset” and “Death of a Clown”. In 2003, the album was ranked #288 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

3. Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround (Part One) (1970)

The Kinks - Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround (Part One)

Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One, (aka Lola Versus Powermac), or just Lola, is the eighth studio album by British rock band the Kinks, recorded and released in 1970. A concept album, it is a satirical appraisal of the music industry, including song publishers, unions, the press, accountants, business managers, and life on the road. Musically Lola Versus Powerman is varied, described by Stephen Thomas Erlewine as “a wildly unfocused but nonetheless dazzling tour de force”, containing some of Ray Davies’ strongest songs.

Although it appeared during a transitional period for the Kinks, Lola Versus Powerman was a success both critically and commercially for the group, charting in the Top 40 in America and helping restore them in the public eye, making it a “comeback” album. It contained two hit singles: “Lola”, which reached the top 10 in the US and UK, and “Apeman”, which peaked at number five in the UK.

2. Arthur or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire (1969)

The Kinks - Arthur or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire

Arthur (Or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire) is the seventh studio album by English rock band the Kinks, released in October 1969. Kinks frontman Ray Davies constructed the concept album as the soundtrack to a Granada Television play and developed the storyline with novelist Julian Mitchell; however, the television programme was cancelled and never produced. The rough plot revolved around Arthur Morgan, a carpet-layer, who was based on Ray and guitarist Dave Davies’ brother-in-law Arthur Anning.

1. The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society (1968)

The Kinks - The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society

The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society is the sixth studio album by the English rock group the Kinks, released in November 1968. It was the last album by original quartet, as bassist Pete Quaife left the group in early 1969. A collection of vignettes of English life, The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society was assembled from songs written and recorded over the previous two years.

Although the record is widely considered one of the most influential and important works by the Kinks, it failed to chart upon release, selling about 100,000 copies. In 2003 the album was ranked number 255 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. (wikipedia info https://en.wikipedia.org/w…rvation_Society)

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